DTaP (Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis)

This helps protect against Diphtheria, Tetanus (lockjaw), and Pertussis (whooping cough). With this injection, there are usually only mild side effects such as fever, some fussiness, and local soreness, redness, or swelling at the injection site. Acetaminophen may be given to help relieve these symptoms. For the benefits and risks per the CDC, click here.

Hepatitis A

This vaccine helps to protect against the Hepatitis A virus, which can cause serious liver disease. Hepatitis A can also cause mild flu-like illness, jaundice ( yellow skin and eyes), severe stomach pains, and diarrhea. The side effects of the vaccine include soreness at the injection site, headache and fatigue. For the benefits and risks per the CDC, click here.

Varivax

This vaccine is given to immunize against the varicella virus, commonly known as chicken pox. Under Georgia State Law, Varivax is required prior to entering school. Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the C.D.C. recognize Varivax as a safe and effective vaccine. Initially after the vaccine, there may be fever, local redness, swelling, and a rash. For a period of up to six weeks, there may be a chicken pox rash at the site or a small amount of lesions generalized over the body. There is also a chance for fever during this period of time. No salicylates (aspirin products) should be given after the vaccine for 6 weeks.  For the benefits and risks per the CDC, click here.

Meningococcal

This vaccine helps protect against bacterial meningitis, which is an infection of fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord. There are usually only mild side effects such as fever, redness, or pain at the injection site. For the benefits and risks per the CDC, click here.

Gardasil

Gardasil is a vaccine given to females and males between 9-26 years of age, and is designed to protect against the human papilloma virus (HPV). The vaccine was developed to prevent cervical cancer, pre-cancerous genital lesions, and genital warts due to HPV. For the benefits and risks per the CDC, click here.

Hepatitis B

This helps protect against Hepatitis B which is a virus that can cause a severe liver infection. There are usually only mild side effects such as soreness at the injection site. For the benefits and risks per the CDC, click here.

HIB (Haemophilus Influenzae B)

This helps protect against the bacteria H, Flu type B. This bacteria is a major cause of childhood pneumonia, meningitis, epiglotitis, and blood infections. This vaccine's side effects consist of low grade fever, redness, swelling, and warmth at the injection site. This usually occurs between 24-48 hrs. after the vaccination is given. For the benefits and risks per the CDC, click here.

MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)

This vaccine protects against measles, mumps, and rubella. Soon after receiving this vaccine, some redness, soreness, or swelling at the injection site may occur. On some rare occasions, 1-2 weeks after receiving this vaccine, a rash and fever may be noticed. 1-3 weeks after getting the vaccine, some pain, soreness, or swelling in one or more joints, lasting up to three days, may occur. For the benefits and risks per the CDC, click here.

IPV (Injectable Polio Vaccine)
Prevnar

The Prevnar vaccine protects against pneumococcal disease. Pneumococcal disease is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, and can also cause blood infections and ear infections. After the vaccine, some children have local redness, tenderness or swelling where the shot was given. A low-grade fever may also be present. For the benefits and risks per the CDC, click here.

This vaccine protects against polio. The side effects for this vaccine consist of a low-grade fever and mild soreness at the sight of the injection. For the benefits and risks per the CDC, click here.

Rotateq

An oral vaccine given to infants between 6-12 weeks of age to help protect against rota virus (a virus that causes vomiting and diarrhea). For the benefits and risk per the CDC, click here.

DISCLAIMER:

The purpose of the website is to provide information of a general nature. It is intended to be used for informational purposes. The information is meant to be consistent with the standard of care at the time of publication. It is not intended to replace or substitute for the medical advice or decision making provided by one's practitioner. All the information on this website is presented as is, without any warranties of any kind, expressed or implied. North Point Pediatrics takes no responsibility for the all inclusive accuracy and content of this website or of the links from this website. Visiting this website DOES NOT establish a patient-physician relationship with any physician or practitioner associated with North Point Pediatrics. Furthermore, one should consult one's own physician for specific advice for one's personal situation.

 

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